moment multiplier

moment multiplier

I recently got to encounter a ‘moment multiplier’ leader and it changed me. In fact, I believe it changed the whole crowd. I invited him to speak at my wedding, not knowing what he would do with just a few moments. My expectation was basic. Come to the front, speak to our guests for 6 minutes to explain the concept of foot washing, and then be done. Take the cue, return the mic, return to your seat, and the reception would continue — no big deal. Dancing and fun was up next; the moments I thought everyone was really waiting for.

But, two minutes into a 4 minute speech, I realized we were in the moment everyone was actually waiting for. Time stopped. Although his maximum was 6 minutes, he took only 4. And guess what? In the aftermath of our wedding day, this moment remains one of the top three memories in the minds of our guests. In a total five-hour experience, a 4 minute speech cannot be forgotten. Why and how does this come to pass?

I call this dynamic the ‘moment multiplier leader’. This experience was meant for more than my wedding day, it was intended for my leadership growth. This dynamic begins to occur when the leader accepts that six minutes is more than enough time to make an impact, but they use only four. Every minute has weight and matters. And if one is given only one minute to speak, they are going to work it - ‘til it is dry.

Because I believe it takes time to become a ‘moment multiplier leader’, I see three action steps toward that end. I experienced direct conciseness in those four minutes. Every word was chosen to be built upon the other; each one strengthening and clarifying the message. Second - passion. It allowed his few words to become 3D, and to dive straight to my heart. It was three passionate words that stopped the time - not an entire paragraph.

Closely following passion was the quality of humility. To me it was the most important of all. This leader could have been threatened by his short window to speak, but he wasn’t. In fact, he chose to make it even shorter because it wasn’t about him. It was about the message. And once the message was delivered, he literally dove back into his seat. What you might not know about this individual is that he is a pastor of a bustling church in the midwest. He takes the pulpit every Sunday for 30 minutes, clean notes in hand. But just as I didn’t have many expectations for his contribution, he equally brought none. He just brought a message written in conciseness, delivered with passion, and presented with humility. Because of this, four slim minutes are recalled every time we remember March 24. This is the ‘moment multiplier’ dynamic unveiled.


do it again

do it again

we wear royal blue

we wear royal blue